Food Prepping For Emergecy

Prepping for changing times

If you are like a lot of people, you have already responded to much of what you see in the news about being ready for the coming crisis by storing up food. The signs of the times are everywhere, one would have to live in a cave not to notice them. The good news is that many people have already started to store food for the future but if it is not stored properly then it will be money down the drain. You will want to make sure that you have good food and plenty of it for those emergency times.

 

The Shocking Truth About Food Prepping

When storing food for emergency times vigilance is the key. Be careful when you purchase your food, read the expiration dates, look at storage issues, check supplies, take inventory you do not want to much of one thing. It does not hurt to purchase a little extra of one item over another as long as you know it will be eaten. Just make sure that you and your family will use the items and that you are not wasting good money on things that will not be used. Here are a few simple guidelines that may be helpful to you.

Don’t Trust Generic Plans

It doesn’t take long being a prepper before you are faced with the problem of competing suppliers, each telling you that their food prepping plan is the best. Further, these plans often boil down to telling you to buy X pounds of rice, X pounds of beans, etc., multiplied by the number of people you have in your family, and how many days you are planning for. The truth is that it’s an easy trap to fall into. After all, nobody wants to be caught unprepared. Further, how can anyone realistically determine what is best for your family?

Every family has its own needs, likes and desires. It’s that easy. And the only likes you have to satisfy in an emergency situation is your own, not satisfying what others say you will need. Let’s say that a member of your family has an allergy to peanut products, but the prepping experts say that since peanut butter is such a good foodstuff to stock up on because it will keep for a long time, you should do so? What good will that do the family member who is allergic to peanuts? The plain truth is that it will do far more harm than good.

Another problem with a generic food prepping plan is that it is entirely likely that following such a plan will create shortages of one type of food while you have a surplus of any other. This is just as bad a situation as if you had a shortage of everything. In an ideal situation, you will want to keep a balance of nutritious food that will continue to be in as similar supply as all the others, for as long as needed.

Admittedly, this is a difficult trick to pull off, but it can be done. Perhaps the most difficult part of the problem is dealing with so many different unknowns when you are planning. For example, how many days is it realistic to plan for you to be in such a situation? How can anybody really know with any great degree of accuracy? In most cases you will need to rely on rules of thumb, but with other factors such as what percentages you will need of different sorts of products, it is much easier to estimate what you would need as opposed to what you will need less of.

A Workable Plan

The best guide you can use to determine what you will need in a given future situation is to rely on the past. What, for example, have you eaten in the past two weeks that could be repeated in a crisis situation? This is as good a place to start as any.

Once you have your list, look at it carefully to decide what might not be available and/or affordable in a crisis. Meat is a good example. If you don’t have a stockyard in your backyard, you probably will not have access to fresh meat in a crisis. If so, it will probably have such a high price tag that it would be better to make a staple of something else.

Variety is the spice of life, whether you’re in a crisis or not, so make sure that everything you think you could use is accounted for. You will reap the benefits for some time to come.

Tom

I have always had an enthusiasm for homesteading and for living off the grid even though I live in a combination of country and urban setting. Living in Central Florida north of the big cities we have the best of both worlds, country and the conveniences that a person would have living in a large urban city. I personally have had a concern about our weakening economy and how it effects each and every-one of us. The second thing that I have a concern about is how most of the world view’s our country and what may happen one day here in the United States. My Life Experiences I was raised by parents that grew up during the great depression, they passed onto me what life was like and how people had to live during this time period. My family were farmers, gardeners, and homesteaders, they were raised this way and they passed onto me these qualities. I also have family members that live totally off the grid. They live in the North Woods of Minnesota which is a great location for living off the grid. The Southern Homesteader is a passion of mine, I love passing on and sharing information about cooking, news, being self-sufficient, living off the grid, canning, food storage, budgeting, and much more. Since this blog is a passion of mine I am constantly adding and tweaking this site to be a better resource for you. More About Me I grew up in Northern Illinois farm fields. After spending most of my life in large corporate business I decided to relocate to a small town on the nature coast of Central Florida. This is where I met my wife and between us we have 4 wonderful daughters. We have a small homestead where we raise our chicken and live freely. We also have a bug-out place in the mountains of North Carolina that we call our retreat. We spend time there getting things prepared for all our family members when SHTF. I am blessed with a wonderful family and the knowledge that God has given me so I can pass this along to you the readers. I will never tell what you what to do or what to purchase, I just am offering my opinion. I want to take this time to thank each and every one of you. Always feel free to contact me and drop me a note. I will do my best to respond to your emails in a timely manner. Thank you again, Tom Johnson

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