Water-Bath Canning At Home To Preserve Food

Canning for a lot of people may seem like a lot of hard messy work or just sometimes extremely overwhelming. In reality it is fun, safe, a great way to save money and canning can be a great family

hobby.

I remember as a child my parents would do a lot of canning, my parents grew up in the depression so they learnt a lot of essential ways to make things last and one of them was canning.
When people think of canning they think that they will be needing to purchase a pressure cooker for canning, but in reality there is a
very simple way of canning called water-bath canning where you do not need a pressure cooker, all you will need is a large stock pot and some mason jars.
Water-bath canning is nothing new, it has been around for
years. A person can water-bath can for almost any food that is acidic foods. If the food group is low in acid then it is best to use a pressure cooker.

 

Items
Needed To Start Canning
  • To get started you will need a large tall pot, something on
    the order of a stock pot. After you put in your jars of fruit you will want to be able to fill the pot with water about 2 inches above the top of the jars.

 

    • You will also want another pot for boiling water in order to
    • sterilize the rings and lids of the jars.
    • Having a simple canning tool set makes things very handy for
      handling the jars and lids and the hot boiling water during the canning process.
    • Now check all the jars for cracks, nicks, sharp edges, be
      careful but run your finger along the top edge of the jar. Now check the rings and the lids that will be screwing onto the jars. Check them for dents, rust, bent, it is best to use only perfect jars and lids in order to get a good airtight seal. Wash the jars and lids, dishwashers are the best to make them as
      clean as possible, some recipes call for the jars and lids to be sterile.

    • Fill your pot about half full with clean warm water and put
      the pot on the stove centering the pot in the middle of the burner. Preheat the water to just simmering for raw canned foods and if the food is hot to be canned heat the water to just barely boiling.
    • While the water is preheating fill your jars with the food
      to be canned and work out any air using a nonmetallic spatula. Wipe the edge of the canning jars and lids with a clean dry cloth and install the lids on the filled jars. Adjust the band so the lids are snug on the jars so they do not leak.
  • Load the filled jars with the lids installed into the pot
    one at a time until you cannot get no other jars into the pot. Add more boiling water so that the water level is at least one to two inches above the tops of the jars. Then cover the pot.

  • Check the recipe that you are using to see how long the jars
    need to stay in the boiling water. If the water drops add more water to keep the jars covered. No need to have the jars in a rapid boiling bath, just make sure that the water continues to boil during the entire process. Once the recipe says the time is finished, turn off the heat to the burner and leave the jars in the water for an additional five minutes. Then lift the jars out of the water one at a time being careful not to tilt the jars.
  • After the jars are cooled and have rested for about six
    hours check the seals on the jars to make sure they are all fully sealed. If the seal did not hold, try the process again or use this jar first.

 

 


Posted by Tom

I have always had an enthusiasm for homesteading and for living off the grid even though I live in a combination of country and urban setting. Living in Central Florida north of the big cities we have the best of both worlds, country and the conveniences that a person would have living in a large urban city. I personally have had a concern about our weakening economy and how it effects each and every-one of us. The second thing that I have a concern about is how most of the world view’s our country and what may happen one day here in the United States. My Life Experiences I was raised by parents that grew up during the great depression, they passed onto me what life was like and how people had to live during this time period. My family were farmers, gardeners, and homesteaders, they were raised this way and they passed onto me these qualities. I also have family members that live totally off the grid. They live in the North Woods of Minnesota which is a great location for living off the grid. The Southern Homesteader is a passion of mine, I love passing on and sharing information about cooking, news, being self-sufficient, living off the grid, canning, food storage, budgeting, and much more. Since this blog is a passion of mine I am constantly adding and tweaking this site to be a better resource for you. More About Me I grew up in Northern Illinois farm fields. After spending most of my life in large corporate business I decided to relocate to a small town on the nature coast of Central Florida. This is where I met my wife and between us we have 4 wonderful daughters. We have a small homestead where we raise our chicken and live freely. We also have a bug-out place in the mountains of North Carolina that we call our retreat. We spend time there getting things prepared for all our family members when SHTF. I am blessed with a wonderful family and the knowledge that God has given me so I can pass this along to you the readers. I will never tell what you what to do or what to purchase, I just am offering my opinion. I want to take this time to thank each and every one of you. Always feel free to contact me and drop me a note. I will do my best to respond to your emails in a timely manner. Thank you again, Tom Johnson